Ocskay Eszter and Zólyomi Ernő

Ernő:

When I landed a job at Hámori Waldorf School, I knew neither Waldorf pedagogy, nor anthroposophy. I needed a job quickly, and they said that I would get a free hand in accomplishing my musical plans. Thus, I found myself in this situation seemingly by chance.

Eszter: 

That winter we two played Mary and Joseph at the school pastorale. I was just finishing my teacher training, but as I had more experience about Waldorf school, I decided that I wanted to teach here. We got to know teacher personalities with deep knowledge who made a profound impact on us, and who eventually became our masters.

Ernő:

As we start dealing with this pedagogy, we too start going down the path of change. We must, since we teach with our own personalities, with the help of our own human quality. Children – even without words – are mostly curious about “Who are you?”, because they want to connect, can connect with the man. Then all the knowledge can be built upon this, which knowledge we would like to convey to them. No wonder that with time I felt a certain kind of responsibility, the teacher’s responsibility. The fundamental reading of Waldorf pedagogy, General Anthropology, begins with a grand celebration when Steiner calls our attention to how fantastic a festive event is that we can teach like this. At the same time, it also has gravity, since every single deed or gesture of yours as a teacher bears significance and meaning.

Eszter:

We have a beautiful teacher prayer one of whose lines goes like this: “Please allow us to accomplish our fate of service.” We must be aware of the fact continuously that if we do something today, it will bear significance years later in the adulthood of our children. As a pedagogue, we must stand before children to do our job with this knowledge day by day.